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Biology of Lung Repair and Regeneration

Employer
University of California San Francisco
Location
San Francisco, California
Salary
Commensurate with NIH guidelines plus housing supplement for San Francisco
Closing date
Dec 24, 2021
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Biology of Lung Repair and Regeneration

Postdoctoral fellowship at University of California San Francisco is available to study the cellular basis of epithelial regeneration or progressive epithelial dysplasia and fibrosis in injured human lungs.  The goal is to elucidate key, and hopefully actionable, determinants of the fate of alveolar type II (AEC2s) stem cells during injury repair and is based on our recent discovery that human AEC2s transdifferentiate to pro-fibrotic basal cells under stress (NCB, in press).  The project will involve isolation and parallel transcriptional/epigenetic profiling of human AEC2s from normal and fibrotic lungs.  Mediators of transdifferentiation will be defined in organoids, cultured lung slices, and in vivo transplantation into mice.  Qualified candidates should have not only experience in cell and molecular biology but also experience and interest in single cell genomic analyses using state-of-the art tools to interrogate differentiation states.  The ideal candidate will have experience in bioinformatic analyses. Send CV, a summary of research experience and training, and contact information for 3 references to Hal Chapman, M.D. Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco. Email: hal.chapman@ucsf.edu.

The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age or protected veteran status.

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