Postdoctoral Position in Cell Signaling

Employer
The Columbia University Medical Center
Location
New York City, New York (US)
Salary
Salary will be based on NIH guidelines
Posted
February 19 2019
Position Type
Full Time
Organization Type
Academia
Job Type
Postdoc

Postdoctoral Position in Cell Signaling

A postdoctoral position is available to study the signaling mechanism of ocular development and diseases.  The eye is the most accessible part of CNS for studying developmental mechanisms and testing stem cell and gene therapies.  Among the current projects, we are studying the crosstalk among Receptor Tyrosine Kinase pathways in lens development, the downstream targets of FGF signaling in lacrimal gland branching morphogenesis and the role of cell adhesion in neuronal differentiation and astrocyte migration in the retina.  We seek a postdoctoral fellow to combine cell biology and mouse genetics to study these signal transduction mechanisms.  Potential candidate should be highly motivated with a Ph.D. degree in biomedical science and a strong background in biochemistry and cell biology.  Experience in mouse genetics is desirable but not necessary.  The successful postdoc candidate will receive training in genetic, molecular and biochemical approaches in vision research, interacting with basic scientists and physicians in a multidisciplinary environment. For details of the research projects, please visit:  https://www.pathology.columbia.edu/profile/xin-zhang-phd

Relevant Publications

  1. Li H, Mao Y, Bouaziz M, Yu H, Qu X, Wang F, Feng GS, Shawber C, Zhang X. Lens differentiation is controlled by the balance between PDGF and FGF signaling. 2019. PLoS Biol. 2019. 17(2):e3000133.
  2. Collins TN, Mao Y, Li H, Bouaziz M, Hong A, Feng GS, Wang F, Quilliam LA, Chen L, Park T, Curran T, Zhang X. 2018. Crk proteins transduce FGF signaling to promote lens fiber cell elongation. eLife. 7:e32586.
  3. Garg A, Hannan A, Wang Q, Collins T, Teng S, Bansal M, Zhong J, Xu K, Zhang X. 2018. FGF-induced Pea3 transcription factors program the genetic landscape for cell fate determination. PLoS Genetics. 14(9):e1007660.
  4. Tao C, Zhang X. 2016. Retinal Proteoglycans Act as Cellular Receptors for Basement Membrane Assembly to Control Astrocyte Migration and Angiogenesis. Cell Reports. 17, 1832–1844.

Please send CV with names and contact information of three references to: Xin Zhang, Ph.D., Departments of Ophthalmology, Pathology & Cell Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032.  Email: xz2369@columbia.edu

The Columbia University Medical Center is located in New York City, which offers world-class museums, performing arts and numerous culture opportunities.  With top ranked Ph.D. programs, medical school and affiliated hospitals, it presents a collaborative and stimulating academic environment for research excellence.

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