Postdoctoral position on Drosophila tumor models

Employer
Deng Lab
Location
Tallahassee, Florida
Salary
$47,000 per year
Posted
June 22 2018
Position Type
Full Time
Organization Type
Academia
Job Type
Postdoc

A postdoctoral position is available at the Wu-Min Deng lab in FSU.  Supported by grants from NIH, NSF and Florida Department of Health, the Deng lab is interested in how intercellular communications affect normal development and how disruption of such communications leads to abnormalities such as tumorigenesis in the Drosophila model system. The major research topics include: (1) Notch signaling in development in tumorigenesis; (2) Cell competition and compensatory growth; and (3) The effects of tissue microenvironment on tumor initiation and progression. 

Candidates for the postdoctoral position should have a Ph.D. degree, and a high degree of interest and motivation toward applying genetic, genomic, biochemical and molecular methods to investigate basic biological questions in development and Drosophila tumor models. Prior experience in Drosophila and/or genomics will be helpful.

For those who are interested in the position, please email wumin@bio.fsu.edu.

Professor Wu-Min Deng

Department of Biological Science

Florida State University

Tallahassee, FL 32306-4295

Tel: 850-645-1501

http://www.bio.fsu.edu/faculty.php?faculty-id=wumin

http://bio.fsu.edu/~denglab/

Related References.

Tamori, Y., Bialucha, C. U., Tian, A.-G., Kajita, M., Huang, Y.-C., Norman, M., Harrison, N., Poulton, J., Ivanovitch, K., Disch, L., Liu, T., Deng, W.-M.,* Fujita, Y.* (2010).  Involvement of Lgl and Mahjong/VprBP in cell competition.  Plos Biology 8(7):e1000422.  

Tamori, Y., & Deng, W.-M. (2013). Tissue repair through cell competition and compensatory cellular hypertrophy in postmitotic epithelia. Developmental Cell, 25, 350-363.

Palmer WH, Jia D, Deng, WM. (2014). Cis-interactions between Notch and its ligands block ligand-independent Notch activity. eLife. 3:e04415.

Tamori, Y., Suzuki E., Deng, W.-M. (2016) Epithelial Tumors Originate in Tumor Hotspots, a Tissue-Intrinsic Microenvironment. PLoS Biol. 14(9):e1002537.

Xie, G., Chen, H., Jia, D., Shu, Z., Palmer, W.H., Zeng, X., Hou, S.X., Jiao, R., Deng, W-M. (2017). The SWI/SNF complex protein Snr1 is a tumor suppressor in Drosophila imaginal tissues. Cancer Research, 77(4):862-873.

Tamori, Y., Deng, W.-M. (2017) Tissue-Intrinsic Tumor Hotspot: Terroir for TumorigenesisTrends in Cancer, 3, 259-268.