Postdoctoral Researcher on High-Brightness Perovskite Light Emitting Devices

Employer
imec
Location
Europe
Posted
October 02 2017
Discipline
Other
Position Type
Full Time
Organization Type
Academia

Imec is the world-leading research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics and digital technologies. The combination of our widely acclaimed leadership in microchip technology and profound software and ICT expertise is what makes us unique. By leveraging our world-class infrastructure and local and global ecosystem of partners across a multitude of industries, we create groundbreaking innovation in application domains such as healthcare, smart cities and mobility, logistics and manufacturing, and energy.


As a trusted partner for companies, start-ups and universities we bring together close to 3,500 brilliant minds from over 70 nationalities. Imec is headquartered in Leuven, Belgium and also has distributed R&D groups at a number of Flemish universities, in the Netherlands, Taiwan, USA, China, and offices in India and Japan. All of these particular traits make imec to be a top-class employer. To strengthen this position as a leading player in our field, we are looking for those passionate talents that make the difference! Currently we are looking for a motivated Postdoctoral Researcher on High-brightness perovskite light emitting devices.


The job


Thanks to their low temperature processing on large-area flexible substrates, thin film light emitting devices such as Organic LEDs, Quantum Dot LEDs and Perovskite LEDs are very attractive for direct additive integration into display applications. These devices, however, have a limited maximum brightness that is ~100 times less than what can be achieved by inorganic III-V LEDs. High brightness is a key enabler for future display applications such as Augmented and Mixed Reality where the display is operated in bright daylight. We therefore want to explore new options leading to increased light output in thin film LEDs. Further down the road, the development of such devices is an important milestone towards the realization of electrically pumped lasers.


The brightness limitation in current technologies have several causes on which we plan to act:


  • Efficiency roll-off due to quenching processes. OLEDs are fundamentally limited by exciton quenching processes that jeopardize operation at high polaron and exciton densities. The rather novel 2D perovskite light emitting thin films do not display such limitations, but are limited by Auger recombination processes. We will research bandgap engineering to lower non-radiative recombination processes in perovskite light emitters.

  • Current density limitation in thin-film devices. We will work on novel dual-gate light emitting transistor architectures to channel large amount of charges into the radiative recombination zone, thereby avoiding the use of highly doped transport layers and concentrating the light-emission zone.

At imec, we have recently made important steps towards high brightness emission. To reach our targets, further research is planned on above-outlined material and device design. We are therefore looking for a Postdoctoral researcher with experience in the processing of organic/perovskite light emitting devices or similar types of devices. The position requires hands-on lab experience with thin film LED fabrication and characterization. A strong background in opto-electronics of organic semiconductors / perovskites / oxides as well as a good understanding of the physics governing charge transport and recombination in thin film devices are desirable. The candidate will join a research team with very considerable background in OLEDs, organic and oxide transistors, perovskite materials and AMOLED displays.


The work will involve: 1- the integration of new materials as charge transport layers and as emitting layers in standard devices; 2- integration into novel device architectures; 3 - optimization of the device electrical driving schemes; 4 - electrical and optical characterization and interpretation.



This job comes from a partnership with Science Magazine and Euraxess