PhD Candidate in Molecular Cell Biology

Employer
University of Amsterdam
Location
Netherlands
Posted
September 04 2017
Position Type
Full Time
Organization Type
Academia

The Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences (SILS) is seeking for an enthusiastic and talented PhD candidate who likes to work in a multi-disciplinary team of scientists.


Project description

Immune cells permeate blood vessel walls to cure inflamed surrounding tissue in case of inflammations (for a movie of this process see: White blood cell passing a layer of endothelial cells). At the same time, the leakage of fluid and macromolecules must be limited in order to maintain the vascular homeostasis. It is becoming increasingly clear that highly controlled, local re-organization of endothelial cell shape is essential for transendothelial migration (TEM). However, exactly how the passage of immune cells is orchestrated and how, at the same time, the endothelial barrier function remains intact is largely unknown.


This project aims at understanding how local and global signaling in endothelial cells by RhoGTPases regulates the endothelial barrier function during transendothelial migration of leukocytes. To this end, we will combine a realistic in vitro model of TEM-under-flow with state-of-the-art functional imaging techniques and perturbation methods to measure and control the location and timing of RhoGTPase activity. With this unique approach, we will be able to reveal the local signaling events that at the same time coordinate transendothelial migration and endothelial barrier function in unprecedented detail. The project will be performed in close collaboration with the Molecular Cell Biology lab in the department of Plasma Proteins of Sanquin.


The project involves molecular biology (cloning), eukaryotic cell culture, fluorescent biosensor engineering and imaging, optogenetics and advanced microscopy.


The project is funded by a grant from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).



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