Computational design of artificial receptor proteins

Employer
KU Leuven
Location
Europe
Posted
July 05 2017
Position Type
Full Time
Organization Type
Academia

For the Biochemistry, Molecular and Structural Biology Section we are looking for a highly motivated doctoral researcher who will perform scientific research and contribute to didactic tasks within the division. The laboratory has an in expertise in biomolecular modelling, structural bioinformatics as well as experimental biophysics and protein crystallography. Our focus is on the rational design of of novel bio-active molecules such as drugs (including protein protein interaction targets and nuclear receptors) or novel proteins (with applications ranging from catalysis to bionanotechnology and biopharmaceuticals) via computational and experimental methods.


In this proposal we are currently looking to redesign nuclear receptors, a common drug target for a variety of diseases, to bind a novel ligand in order to establish an orthogonal signalling pathway for synthetic biology applications but also to understand the mechanism of these class of receptors which may help to identify novel therapeutic strategies. While this project is mainly computational, there will be also some experimental work involved.


In this proposal we are currently looking to redesign nuclear receptors, a common drug target for a variety of diseases, to bind a novel ligand in order to establish an orthogonal signalling pathway for synthetic biology applications but also to understand the mechanism of these class of receptors which may help to identify novel therapeutic strategies. In this project, you will mainly apply computational methods (molecular dynamics, computational protein design relying on the  Rosetta protein modelling suite, computational drug design methods, pharmacophore modelling and chemo-informatics).  There will be also some experimental work involved at our collaborators experimental laboratory.



This job comes from a partnership with Science Magazine and Euraxess